Tag Archives: World Book Day

The Colours of Britain

A selection of the works of Jamila Gavin

A selection of the works of Jamila Gavin

To celebrate the first ‘birthday’ of the Cotswold Word Centre – the platform for language, literacy and literature based at Hawkwood College of which I am the volunteer co-ordinator – on World Book Day, we hosted a talk by our patron, Stroud-based writer Jamila Gavin. Jamila was born to a mixed-raced parentage* – an English mother and Indian father, who met as teachers in Iran – raised mainly in India until eleven when her family moved to England for good – and this ‘hybrid’ status has informed everything she has written, making her an important champion for multi-culturalism. Weened on a trunk of her mother’s English classics, which accompanied them on their many travels, Jamila initially trained as a pianist, but was a gifted letter-writer. Her childhood years were spent hopping from country to country, capital to capital – Paris, Berlin, London. This combination – of rounded education, cross-fertilisation of culture and polyglot articulacy – led to her working for the BBC as a Studio Manager. She married and raised her children Stroud where she has lived for forty years. Her first book was published in 1979 – The Magic Orange Tree – a collection of multi-cultural tales; and she has gone on to write an impressive range of children’s books, short stories, autobiography, plays, collections of myths and fairy tales, and contributions to anthologies supporting causes such as Greenpeace, and Human Rights. Her most recent work is a story for an anthology exploring the First World War, and her latest collection of magical tales, Blackberry Blue – a fairy story in the European tradition, but with a female protagonist of colour in the central role (to offer her grand-daughters a positive literary heroine they can relate to). Jamila’s best known work, Coram Boy, was adapted into a stage play by the National Theatre. Her stories have been broadcast on BBC Radio, and she has garnered several awards over her career.

And so we were extremely lucky to have her.

Jamila Gavin by Kevan Manwaring

Jamila Gavin by Kevan Manwaring

Despite the disappointingly low attendance she gave a fascinating talk provocatively titled ‘Why Read? Why Write?’ I managed to record most of it, and it is listenable via the links below. Afterwards, there were some good questions from the small, but engaged audience. I asked if there were any commonalities in her diverse oeuvre – ‘injustice’, she replied, the voices of the marginalised, racism, and a celebration of diversity. A second question of mine was – did her ‘hybrid’ status inform her writing in any way: ‘Absolutely,’ was her reply. I suggested that it gave her, as a writer, a distinct advantage – being able to relate to different traditions, to see beyond the provincial, to be an interlocutor, or, as I put it, a kind of ‘Suez Canal’ (as a child Jamila would travel between India and England by boat, a journey taking two and half weeks, although it would’ve taken a lot longer without the Suez Canal). She has been the bridge to link continents. She is a true transnational writer in the post-colonial tradition, and her work is more important than ever in a time of challenges to multicultural Britain by the likes of the BNP, EDF and UKip – a growing xenophobia fuelled by those wishing to exploit the banking crisis/Austerity-driven discontent. Jamila was gracious, generous and highly articulate – a pleasure to listen to and learn from. Any parent wishing to offer their children a healthy cross-section of fiction would do well to seek out Jamila’s work, as would anyone wishing to have a better understanding of multi-cultural Britain.

*as something of a global mongrel myself, this meti inbetween-ness is something that informs my own writing, especially my current novel project.

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Listen to Jamila’s talks here…. (soon!)

Jamila Gavin author talk 6 March 2015 part 1

Jamila Gavin author talk 6 March 2015 part 2

Wetting the Baby’s Head

A Feast of Words - Josie Felce

A Feast of Words – Josie Felce

Last night we officially wetted the baby’s head with the launch of the Cotswold Word Centre  at Hawkwood College on World Book Day.

Cotswold Word Centre launch

Cotswold Word Centre launch

We gathered in the Studios to schmooze and toast with Bucks Fizz, vino and biodynamic cordial before things got under way in earnest. I introduced the evening, then we had a word from Alicia Carey, the Principal of Hawkwood, followed by Katie Lloyd-Nunn who read out the lovely message from Jamila Gavin, our sponsor (see below).

Anthony Nanson performs 'The Painswick Elders'

Anthony Nanson performs ‘The Painswick Elders’

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Jehanne and Rob Mehta round the evening off

We then had a scintillating line-up of local poets, storytellers, and singers: Jo Bousfield’s group, Playing with Words; Robin Collins; Angie Spencer; Josie Felce; Jo Woolley; Gabriel Millar; Anthony Nanson; and finishing off the proceedings with Jehanne and Rob Mehta. The atmosphere was lovely and warm-hearted, and there were lots of positive comments afterwards. Everybody seemed to have a good time, and many said how well-organised and held the event was. The performers were very professional, keeping it tight and on theme – with some pieces written especially for the event. We have such a wealth of talent in this area – we’re so blessed! It was satisfying to launch my ‘Writers of Gloucestershire’ map, after slaving away on it all winter – a signed limited edition of 100 was produced, and each contributor got to take one home. My hope is the Cotswold Word Centre will put Hawkwood and Stroud even more on the map – as the hub of wonderful word-based activity in the area. We have started a journey- and we hope you join us… A CWC ‘brain shower’ is planned for a month’s time – watch this space!

(from left) Alicia Carey, Principal of Hawkwood College; Kevan Manwaring (co-ordinator of the Cotswold Word Centre); Katie Lloyd-Nunn (education co-ordinator of Hawkwood College)

(from left) Alicia Carey, Principal of Hawkwood College; Kevan Manwaring (co-ordinator of the Cotswold Word Centre); Katie Lloyd-Nunn (education co-ordinator of Hawkwood College)

Message from Jamila Gavin

Jamila Gavin, author, patron of the Cotswold Word Centre

Jamila Gavin, author,
patron of the Cotswold Word Centre

As a somewhat hybrid creature: born in India, worked in London but having settled in Stroud in 1970, I feel very proud to have been asked by the Cotswold Word Centre to be a patron. It makes me feel I belong in a place where I want to belong. I think the first time I heard of the Cotswolds, was as a four year old, hearing my English mother’s somewhat dreamy hope, expressed in a Punjab village, that one day she would have a cottage in the Cotswolds – and indeed she did, albeit about thirty years later. And it’s what brought me to the Cotswolds.

It’s not just the beauty of the area, but something else which makes it such a hive of creativity. There are artists, poets, musicians, film-makers, craftspeople and writers up and down the valleys – and this is not recent. We know so much of the artistic expression that has come from the Cotswolds has embodied a very particular spirit: English, yet British, yet international. It strikes a chord of recognition with people who have never been here, and creates a kind of longing to experience a little bit of that spirit which expresses some kind of universal need.

So it is extremely appropriate that there should be a Cotswold Word Centre which, judging by what has already been achieved, will be, not just a haven, but also a hub, for vibrant creativity, exchange of ideas, safe criticism, and loads and loads of inspiration.  

I look forward to my association with you all.

Jamila Gavin, patron of the Cotswold Word Centre