The Green Fuse

THE GOLDEN ROOM EPISODE #10 – THE GREEN FUSE

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‘The force that through the green fuse drives the flower…’ Dylan Thomas. Photo by Kevan Manwaring, March 2020

This is a special ‘emergency’ episode of The Golden Room to offer some solace during the COVID-19 global crisis, and to celebrate the coming of Spring. However challenging the current circumstances life continues – and is tangible in every hedgerow, every bird-song, every new bud. This medley comprises my selection of classic poems about the season, along with new work by myself, Ella Bloomfield, and the late Jay Ramsay. Music is provided by Chantelle Smith, Rosemary Duxbury, La Zag, Rick Ward, and Beggard Velvet. May you find this selection soothing. Please pass on to any who you feel will benefit from it.

LISTEN TO THE GREEN FUSE HERE

Track Listings:

THE GOLDEN ROOM EPISODE #10 THE GREEN FUSE
  1. Introduction by Kevan Manwaring/Reverie by Rosemary Duxbury
  2. Lines Written in Early Spring: William Wordsworth
  3. Sumer is icumen in: Anon, 13th anon./voice & harp by Chantelle Smith, 2020
  4. The Trees: Philip Larkin
  5. S.L.: La Zag (from ‘Hic Sunt Leones’)
  6. The Names of the Hare: Translation from the Middle English by Seamus Heaney
  7. Didgeridoo: Sam Bloomfield (from ‘Phoenix’ sampler)
  8. Viriditas*: Hildegard von Bingen
  9. Bright Blue Rose: Marko Gallaidhe (trad.)
  10. Heather’s Spring: Kevan Manwaring
  11. Rosemary Duxbury (from ‘Thread of Gold’)
  12. ‘The force that through the green fuse drives the flower’: Dylan Thomas
  13. Oak, Ash, and Thorn: Beggars Velvet (trad. From ‘Lady of Autumn’)
  14. 14.  When green buds hang in the elm: A.E. Housman
  15. My Bonny Cuckoo: Chantelle Smith (trad., recorded 2020)
  16. Cotswold Love: John Drinkwater
  17. Banjo: Rick Ward (from ‘Keeping the Tradition’)
  18. Spring: Edna St. Vincent Millay
  19. Song Birds: Ella Bloomfield (from ‘Phoenix’)
  20. Lullaby: Jay Ramsay (from ‘Phoenix’)

* Viriditas (Latin, literally “greenness,” formerly translated as “viridity”) is a word meaning vitality, fecundity, lushness, verdure, or growth. It is particularly associated with abbess Hildegard von Bingen, who used it to refer to or symbolize spiritual and physical health, often as a reflection of the divine word or as an aspect of the divine nature.

 

Selection by Kevan Manwaring 20th March 2018

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